Hiring without a resume?

by Kate Brodock on 11 February 2008

Posted in: Uncategorized

  • Sharebar

One of the blogs I subscribe to, AVC, posted the following on their site:

A couple years ago, we put up a blog post on the Union Square Ventures weblog and said that we wanted to hire an analyst. The deal was simple – no phone calls, no resumes, no emails – just a link to your web presence. We hired Andrew as a result of that effort and it was a great fit for everyone.

So we are doing the exact same thing again.

While, most unfortunately I don’t think I’d get the job based on my relatively low-level of web presence (it’s ok, I’m not exactly looking for a job right now, but perhaps we can work together in some manner in the future AVC?), this, I have to say, is incredibly cool.  I’m a believer that a resume is a resume, and there are too many things beyond that resume that are important but widely ignored.  AVC recognizes this.

The  important thing AVC recognizes is the increasing power and effectiveness of the web.   You can probably deduce a lot from how someone portrays themselves on the web.  Firstly, they probably have the equivalent of their resume connected to their online selves anyway, as they’re usually a desire to legitimize what they’re putting forth.  To boot, whatever embellishment someone might put on the web, they would probably put on their resume anyway (so you’re not winning or losing either way).

Secondly, you can really get a sense of what someone is all about from what they’re doing online.  Are they succinct and knowledgeable?   Are they linked to billion unmanageable identities, does it mean they take on too much?  Are they attentive to details? Are they mean and nasty or respectful?  Do they like what they do, what they write about, or are they just trying to “be somewhere”?

Who knows, this could start a new trend.  I would be weary if it were to turn into a big fad too quickly, as I think there could be mistakes involved (who’s assessing what makes a good web presence anyway?), but I think there are a few companies or industries that could pull this off.

Caps off to AVC.  And look, they’ve already got proof of concept in their favor.

  • http://fredwilson.vc fred wilson

    you sure you don't want to throw your hat in the ring?

    nice post

    thanks

    fred

  • http://fredwilson.vc fred wilson

    you sure you don’t want to throw your hat in the ring?

    nice post

    thanks

    fred

  • Todd

    Great idea, and I have no doubt that the future of all corporate hiring will be based on your “web presence.” But if I may, I'll draw an analogy to the steroids in major league baseball issue to point out a problem with this. I've heard arguments that go: “Well, I think pro athletes should all just be allowed to use steroids or whatever they want to enhance their performance. After all, that is what I'm paying good money to go see at the ballpark or stadium–good performance! So just make the drugs legit, let everyone do it, and all will be well, right?” WRONG.

    Legalizing steroids in baseball would put everyone who doesn't want to use them (for health or personal reasons or whatever) at a HUGE disadvantage. That would just not be fair. Similarly, driving everyone into the “web presence” market and having that become the only way to have any kind of identity in the 21st-century will be a huge blow to all those who value the quiet, private life…such as myself! What if I don't want to have a Facebook account!? I am trying to hold on to the last vestiges of the “old days” of pen and paper, snail-mail, and, you know, actual human-to-human interaction, while I still can. Their time is running short.

  • Todd

    Great idea, and I have no doubt that the future of all corporate hiring will be based on your “web presence.” But if I may, I’ll draw an analogy to the steroids in major league baseball issue to point out a problem with this. I’ve heard arguments that go: “Well, I think pro athletes should all just be allowed to use steroids or whatever they want to enhance their performance. After all, that is what I’m paying good money to go see at the ballpark or stadium–good performance! So just make the drugs legit, let everyone do it, and all will be well, right?” WRONG.

    Legalizing steroids in baseball would put everyone who doesn’t want to use them (for health or personal reasons or whatever) at a HUGE disadvantage. That would just not be fair. Similarly, driving everyone into the “web presence” market and having that become the only way to have any kind of identity in the 21st-century will be a huge blow to all those who value the quiet, private life…such as myself! What if I don’t want to have a Facebook account!? I am trying to hold on to the last vestiges of the “old days” of pen and paper, snail-mail, and, you know, actual human-to-human interaction, while I still can. Their time is running short.

Previous post:

Next post: